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Women's Volleyball

 

ARTICLE BY OLIVIA MOSS PUBLISHED IN BIG SKY ACADEMIC ONLINE JOURNAL

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Former Sacramento State volleyball player Olivia Moss recently had an article published in the inaugural edition of "Skyline - The Big Sky Undergraduate Journal", which debuted online Monday.

"Skyline" is a collaboration of Big Sky Conference institutions, featuring the academic research and writing by undergraduate students at each of the league's institutions. The publication features research articles that range from microbial populations in synthetic turf, to the effect of hydration education on female gymnasts, as well as various articles discussing concussions in athletics and gender equality.

Moss, who played volleyball at Sacramento State from 2008-12 (redshirt in 2009), wrote a 15-page article entitled "Nutrition Knowledge Assessment of NCAA Division I Big Sky Conference Female Volleyball Players." The piece assesses the quality of nutrition knowledge given to and retained by Big Sky Conference female volleyball players, and determines the sources and frequency of nutrition education received by Big Sky volleyball players.

Moss' article was one of 17 from across the Big Sky that were published in the journal. Articles were submitted to a faculty group at each campus, which then determined the papers that would make the publication. In May, the articles were submitted to the Big Sky Conference, which worked with Berkeley Electronic Press (bepress) Digital Commons.

A dietetics major with minors in biology and chemistry, Moss graduated Cum Laude from Sacramento State in May with a 3.73 grade point average. She finished her career as a three-time Big Sky all-academic selection, and her average of 1.43 blocks per set in 2012 was the 18th best mark in the nation and the ninth best single-season mark in school history.

Sacramento State student John Ramos also contributed to the journal with his entry "Differences in Subclinical Eating and Somatoform Disorder Symptomology Among Hispanic, African American, and Caucasian Collegiate Male Athletes".

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